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A2A Simulations Accu-sim P-40 For P3D v4 Released

P 40 1

Over on their Facebook page, A2A Simulations have announced the release of their Accu-sim P-40 which has finally been brought over to Prepar3D v4.

The Curtiss P-40 is an American, single-prop, single pilot warbird. It is the third most produced aircraft used in World War II with 13,738 P-40s having been made from the early years of 1939-1944.

A2A’s rendition of the P-40 for Prepar3D v4 is packed with a bonanza of features to entice the old school aircraft fanatic. Notable features include, modeled hypoxia (oxygen starvation), a physics-driven sound environment, designed to be built and flown “by the book”, authentic battery capacity based on temperature and so much more that Accu-sim has to offer. The comprehensive features list is rather extensive, we’ve pointed out more notable features down below but if you’re looking for the full list you can find it on the product page here.

You can grab a hold of the mighty A2A Accu-sim P-40 over on the A2A Simulations online store for $49.99-79.99 (Incl. VAT) depending on the version of Prepar3D v4 you own.

Features

  • Rugged, fast, and manoeuvrable.
  • As with every A2A aircraft, it is gorgeously constructed, inside and out, down to the last rivet.
  • Designed and built to be flown “By The Book“.
  • Functional mirror (Can to fine-tuned or turned off to suit performance needs).
  • Visual Real-Time Load Manager, with the ability to load fuel and stores in real-time.
  • Dynamic Cockpit Lighting.
  • Five different models, P-40B, P-40C, AVG model, RAF Tomahawk, and Russian Tomahawk.
  • Feel the exhilaration of flying an Accu-Sim-powered P-40 Warhawk.
  • Curtiss multi-position and/or constant speed type electric propeller.
  • Inertia starter with inertia wheel and engagement.
  • Complete maintenance hangar including landing gear, internal systems and detailed engine tests including compression checks.
  • Understand how a high-performance aircraft behaves and see how well you can cope with all of the unexpected things that can happen. No two flights are ever the same.
  • Piston combustion engine modeling. Air comes in, it mixes with fuel and ignites, parts move, heat up, and all work in harmony to produce the wonderful sound of a V-12, liquid-cooled racing engine. Now the gauges look beneath the skin of your aircraft and show you what Accu-Sim is all about.
  • Spark plugs can clog and eventually foul if the engine is allowed to idle too low for too long. Throttling up an engine with oil-soaked spark plugs can help clear them out and smoke.
  • Overheating can cause scoring of cylinder head walls which could ultimately lead to failure if warnings are ignored and overly abused.
  • Large engined aircraft like the P-40 like to be in the air, not on the ground. So don’t idle for too long, get in the air where the air supply is plentiful.
  • System failures, including flaps that can independently jam or break based on the actual forces put upon them. If you deploy your flaps at too high a speed, you could find yourself in a very dangerous situation.
  • Oil pressure system is affected by oil viscosity (oil thickness). Oil viscosity is affected by oil temp and oil dilution level. Now when you start the engine, you need to be careful and not raise RPM too much until the oil temp is high enough to give proper oil pressure. If you raise RPM too high on a cold engine, especially very cold, oil pressure can rise to over 150 psi. Oil pump failure can result. Extended inverted flight (negative g) can uncover the oil sump and reduce oil pressure. Do not fly in a negative g situation for more than 5 seconds.
  • Oxygen starvation (hypoxia) is modeled. Just take off and climb without oxygen to see.
 
Tags : A2AAccu-SimCurtiss P-40HypoxiaPropellerRelease
Max Dyba

The author Max Dyba

I've been a fervent lover of aviation ever since I caught the bug back in 2009. I'm a seasoned flight simmer being involved in many projects and events within the flight simulation community over the past few years. Once I leave school, I plan to pursue my dream of becoming a commercial airline pilot. In addition to all that, I'm also a keen photographer who revels in plane spotting around the world.